Jorge Luis Borges

Biography and Background

Luis Borges Jorge was born on 24th august 1899 in a place known as Buenos Aires Argentina. He passed on14th June 1986 in Geneva Switzerland. Could possibly be described as an Argentine essayist, short fiction writer and a poet whose literacy works became greatly in the 20th century in the world of literature CITATION Jor78 p 350-412 l 1033 (Rodríguez Monegal 350-412). He grew up in the formerly Shabby Buenos Aires district which actually formed the basis of some of his works. Luis family which was actually notable in the history of Argentina factored in British ancestry and he actually knew English before Spanish. His father’s library was the source of the books that he read fist who was a man of extensive intellect who was an English school teacher. The books were such as the thousand and one nights, Don Quixote and the Adventures of Huckleberry which were all written in English. Under close monitoring and well laid example of his father, Luis from childhood understood that his destiny was a career in literature.

During the year 1914, at the time when World War I just started, Luis and his family moved to Geneva, where he was able to educate himself on French and German languages where he earned his Bachelor of Arts from College de Genève CITATION Sta70 p 32-63 l 1033 (Stabb 32-63). He left with his family in 1919 and headed to Majorca where they spent a year and another year in Spanish mainland, this was the point where Luis united with the Ultraist movement young writers, and organization that opposed what was thought of the decadence of created writers of the 188 period. In 1921 they went back to Buenos Aires where Luis rediscovered his home city and started to adapt into it CITATION Wil041 p 243-331 l 1033 (Williamson 243-331). He published his first book which was a set of poems in 1923. Luis is also famous for starting the ultraist movement in South America. This part of his career factored in authorship of various essay volumes and poems together with beginning three journals of literature that concluded with a biography in 1930. He later overcame his coyness in writing pure fiction. In the beginning he chose to recap the lives of many or less eminent men as it peels out of his 1935 Universal History of Infamy.

To make a living Luis decided to pick on a major position at the library in Buenos Aires in 1938. The library was actually named after one of his ancestors and he spent 9 years in the library. In the year 1938 when his father died, Luis suffered a brutal wound in the head which was followed by poisoning of his blood and left him at the point of death and afraid of getting insane. After this incident he came out with charming stories within the eight years that followed and were later compiled in a set of translations known as The Aleph and Other Stories between 1933 and 1969. He also merged with Bioy Adolfo to come up with detective stories which went by the pseudonym H. Bustos Domecq and published in 1942. It is within this period that Luis also realized his whole dream world which was a paradox of the other one which own symbol systems and language CITATION Nun97 p 612-617 l 1033 (Nunez-Faraco 612-617).

When Dictator Juan Peron assumed power in the year 1946, Luis was relieved of his duties in the library allegedly for articulating support of the enemies during World War II. With aid from friends, he earned a live being a lecturer, writing and editing. When Juan was in 1955 deposed, Luis rose to the national library director, and position filled with honor and also as an American literature and English professor at Buenos Aires University. However, he suffered a setback of total blindness, a disease which was considered hereditary since it had also attacked his father. This compelled him to stop writing huge texts and start dictating to assistants this works from this period own wards almost ruled out the differences between poetry and prose.

After the year 1961 a time when Samuel shared an international prize which was given for manuscripts that were not published, Luis poems were gradually highly praised as 20th century classics within the world of literature. Before that time, Luis was infamous even in his home city of Buenos Aires except for a few writers many of whom knew him as a craftsman of traditional techniques. Until his death, the bad dreams of his fictions had emerged to be related to Franz Kafka’s world and to be commended for focusing on traditional language into the most permanent state. From his works, American Latin literature rose from the intellectual realm of normally sophisticated readers. At some point in the 1950’s Luis began composing screenplays such as Invasión. His last work which lasted from 1956 till his death was as an instructor at the university of Buenos Aires apart from the fact that he was also appointed the National library director in 1956. He succumbed to liver cancer in 1986 in Geneva.

Borges writing styleJorge Luis style of literacy writing is quite similar to the writing styles that exist currently. Luis focus majorly on philosophical fiction, which many times centered specifically on intellectual difficulties of some kind. At some point his essays did not even have plot of development of character, and are dedicated particularly to matters relating to philosophy. Luis was intrigued by epistemological together with metaphysical difficulties and practically all of his essays touched on this interest. The essays of Luis were also weird to some extent, since they factor in the ridiculous set ups and happenings, that range from library houses which are rich in material for the detection of an idea in a room that permits someone to look beyond and understand everything.

Luis also has the style of writing which is distinct as compared to other writers of his time. From his sets of work has acquired the Spanish language greatest writer title. A specific work that showcased his culture was Ficciones. The work was not just about his country of birth but rather true cultural knowledge emerged out from his style of writing. He has the capability of bringing together his readers by maximally making use of the style of writing commonly termed as Irony which is evident in close to whole his works.

Luis ensures that the peak of his specific pieces is hidden until when he concludes within the story. A major example of such is in “The garden of Forking Paths” which Luis places in it such structures, that the start of the story was absent so that when it was not till the end of the story that the story integrates together, which is the opposite of what many writers expected. The style of writing of Luis, is quite unique and in conformity with personal accounts. From Luis extensive elucidation in his phrases, and his skill to make use of irony, he has attained vastness in his writing works.

Death and the CompassThis is one among the many fictitious stories which have been popular worldwide. The story is about Erik who is a detective and is charged with the responsibility of investigating and offering solutions to three murders which happened at intervals of one month each at the point that coincidentally form an equilateral triangle. Erik, who is actually rational via comprehensive thinking, divines places and times that the next murder would happen. He goes ahead to apprehend the murders and preventing crimes that were to occur, this only finds him in a rather complicated situation where he is captured after being fooled by his enemy to a crime scene so that he could be killed CITATION Bel81 p 516-537 l 1033 (Bell-Villada 516-537).

This demonstrates Luis capability to pick a standard sub-genre, in such a situation the story about detective Erik, and provide his individual signature since the story is sated with trade marks of the author himself. The most eminent among these features is hubris and irony. After the first murder and Erik’s investigation published reports, his enemy who has actually sworn to take Erik’s life formulates the murder situation remains, shrewd that Erik will not sit down until the time that he deciphers the obvious patterns and then knowing he understands by virtue of his thinking, all that is there to understand will blindly unveil itself up at the opportune moment for his enemy to kidnap and exterminate him CITATION Sou95 p 39-56 l 1033 (Soud 39-56). Though irony, Erik’s reasoning and relies on thoughts, together with self reliance and intellectual egotism, which actually visor him to any possible risks, lead him to his death. There is also an element within the story are the fact that there is no Latin related content, many references to the Jewish community with intellectual material that is not formal to the detective story CITATION Whe69 p 126-258 l 1033 (Wheelock 126-258). Most of its readers perceive it as a wholly detective story but then the last paragraphs go beyond the eminent genre. Erik together with his enemy are two persons caught between an infinite loop of pursuing and being pursued.

Contributions of Luis on the literacy historyLuis impacted a great force on the future of literacy stories via his genre poetry, essays and Metafictions. Luis was a father and key actor of post modernist literature some organization that literature attempts to separate itself from real live scenarios that favored the innovative process and vital self scrutiny CITATION Yat85 p 564-613 l 1033 (Yates 564-613). Read across the nations, and intensely explicate, Luis was a polymath who actually could dialogue on the famous American and European literature who actually gave a hand to the translators of his works to various languages. The works of Luis Borges have made huge contributions to philosophical literature and magical realism together with fantasy genres CITATION Nun97 p 87-93 l 1033 (Nunez-Faraco 87-93). Magical realism emanated against the naturalism of the 19th century. As a matter of fact Angel Flores who was first to use the term, kick started the birth of these movements in 1935 using Luis Universal History of infamy. He was also able to enact modern symbols of literature via imagination due to his blindness.

Despite the fact that Luis focused a lot on short stories, he also mad a trivial impact on Latin literature in regard to his poetry and essay accomplishments. As a matter of fact without the short stories the Latinos would still have considered him a remarkable writer from his essays and poetry. It is also important to note that Luis was a father to the new narrative a kind of narrative common to persons like Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez among others. Before the times of Luis fictions in Latino were mainly about painting real and comprehensive picture of outside Latin reality. Luis capability to imagine more almost single handedly affected what existed earlier making Latin writers to be much more innovative, reason more and handle fiction as fiction and allow the world of fiction to be just fictional CITATION The p 211-317 l 1033 (Irwin 211-317).

The works of Luis also enriched the writers from Latin nations to handle themes that are universal and write for the sake of intellectual audiences or readers. This means that Luis injected superb stories in the world of literacy. Narratives from Latin writers would have been fundamentally distinct from what it is now.Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges exerted a strong influence on the direction of literary fiction through his genre-bending metafictions, essays, and poetry. Borges was a founder, and principal practitioner, of postmodernist literature, a movement in which literature distances itself from life situations in favor of reflection on the creative process and critical self-examination. Widely read and profoundly erudite, Borges was a polymath who could discourse on the great literature of Europe and America and who assisted his translators as they brought his work into different languages. He was influenced by the work of such fantasists as Edgar Allan Poe and Franz Kafka, but his own fiction “combines literary and extraliterary genres in order to create a dynamic, electric genre,” to quote Alberto Julián Pérez in the Dictionary of Literary Biography. Pérez also noted that Borges’s work “constitutes, through his extreme linguistic conscience and a formal synthesis capable of representing the most varied ideas, an instance of supreme development in and renovation of narrative techniques. With his exemplary literary advances and the reflective sharpness of his metaliterature, he has effectively influenced the destiny of literature.”

Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges exerted a strong influence on the direction of literary fiction through his genre-bending metafictions, essays, and poetry. Borges was a founder, and principal practitioner, of postmodernist literature, a movement in which literature distances itself from life situations in favor of reflection on the creative process and critical self-examination. Widely read and profoundly erudite, Borges was a polymath who could discourse on the great literature of Europe and America and who assisted his translators as they brought his work into different languages. He was influenced by the work of such fantasists as Edgar Allan Poe and Franz Kafka, but his own fiction “combines literary and extraliterary genres in order to create a dynamic, electric genre,” to quote Alberto Julián Pérez in the Dictionary of Literary Biography. Pérez also noted that Borges’s work “constitutes, through his extreme linguistic conscience and a formal synthesis capable of representing the most varied ideas, an instance of supreme development in and renovation of narrative techniques. With his exemplary literary advances and the reflective sharpness of his metaliterature, he has effectively influenced the destiny of literature.” In his preface to Labyrinths: Selected Stories and Other Writings, French author André Maurois called Borges “a great writer.” Maurois wrote that Borges “composed only little essays or short narratives. Yet they suffice for us to call him great because of their wonderful intelligence, their wealth of invention, and their tight, almost mathematical style. Argentine by birth and temperament, but nurtured on universal literature, Borges [had] no spiritual homeland.” Borges was nearly unknown in most of the world until 1961 when, in his early sixties, he was awarded the Prix Formentor, the International Publishers Prize, an honor he shared with Irish playwright Samuel Beckett. Prior to winning the award, according to Gene H. Bell-Villada in Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art, “Borges had been writing in relative obscurity in Buenos Aires, his fiction and poetry read by his compatriots, who were slow in perceiving his worth or even knowing him.” The award made Borges internationally famous: a collection of his short stories, Ficciones, was simultaneously published in six different countries, and he was invited by the University of Texas to come to the United States to lecture, the first of many international lecture tours. Borges’s international appeal was partly a result of his enormous erudition, which becomes immediately apparent in the multitude of literary allusions from cultures around the globe that are contained in his writing. “The work of Jorge Luis Borges,” Anthony Kerrigan wrote in his introduction to the English translation of Ficciones, “is a species of international literary metaphor. He knowledgeably makes a transfer of inherited meanings from Spanish and English, French and German, and sums up a series of analogies, of confrontations, of appositions in other nations’ literatures. His Argentinians act out Parisian dramas, his Central European Jews are wise in the ways of the Amazon, his Babylonians are fluent in the paradigms of Babel.” In the National Review, Peter Witonski commented: “Borges’s grasp of world literature is one of the fundamental elements of his art.” The familiarity with world literature evident in Borges’s work was initiated at an early age, nurtured by a love of reading. His paternal grandmother was English and, since she lived with the Borgeses, English and Spanish were both spoken in the family home. Jorge Guillermo Borges, Borges’s father, had a large library of English and Spanish books, and his son, whose frail constitution made it impossible to participate in more strenuous activities, spent many hours reading. “If I were asked to name the chief event in my life, I should say my father’s library,” Borges stated, in “An Autobiographical Essay,” which originally appeared in the New Yorker and was later included in The Aleph and Other Stories, 1933-1969.

Works Cited

BIBLIOGRAPHY Bell-Villada, Gene H. Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.

Irwin, John T. The Mystery to a Solution: Poe, Borges, and the Analytic Detective Story. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.

Nunez-Faraco, Humberto. In Search of The Aleph: Memory, Truth, and Falsehood in Borges’s Poetics. The Modern Language Review 92, 197.

Rodríguez Monegal, Emir. Jorge Luis Borges: A Literary Biography. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1978.

Sabajanes, Beatriz Sarlo. Jorge Luis Borges: A Writer on the Edge. New York: Verso, 193.

Soud, Stephen E. Borges the Golem-Maker: Intimations of `Presence’ in `The Circular Ruins. MLN 110, 195.

Stabb, Martin S. Jorge Luis Borges. New York: Twayne, 1970.

Wheelock, Carter. The Mythmaker: A Study of Motif and Symbol in the Short Stories of Jorge Luis Borges. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1969.

Williamson, Edwin. Borges: A Life. . New York: Viking, 2004.

Yates, Donald A. Jorge Luis Borges: Life, Work, and Criticism. Fredericton, Canada: York Press, 185.

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