Adult Learning and Online Learning
March 4, 2019
Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) – Good Answers
March 4, 2019

how textual interpretation varies with different readers and different historical contexts.

how textual interpretation varies with different readers and different historical contexts.

Purpose:
For
this assignment, we will demonstrate an understanding of how textual
interpretation varies with different readers and different historical contexts.
For our case study, we will examine the history of audience reception of
productions of Othello
in
the United States and Great Britain.

Writing
Task:
Compare
at least two historical contexts for the reception of Shakespeare’s Othello. Look at all
the resources in our Course Content about Shakespeare and Othello. Gather
specific evidence to analyze and use in your paper. Prompt: In an essay of
1250 to 1500 words, address the following prompt.

According to each historical period you have selected, what
are the “lessons” of Othello?
(in other words)
How does Othello reflect the
values of the audience and critics of two or more historical periods?

Contemporary
audiences read this play a particular way, but 19century audiences who watched
this role played by a white actor in blackface at a time when slavery was legal
in America simply could not have received the play as we commonly discuss it
today. Why
did they like this play? What did it mean to them? What does it mean to us?
What did it mean during Shakespeare’s time?
These are fascinating questions
we will ponder this term as we consider how textual interpretation varies
within historical contexts. Literature endures, but its lessons can change.

Research
Your
paper should cite at least five sources. You are most
welcome to use sources from our course content. Use MLA style. Google if you do not know how to cite an online article or
YouTube video.

At least two of these five sources should be academic. Scholarly
(academic) sources are written by experts for other experts. They have been
peer-reviewed and are considered more credible than the hundreds of (possibly
useful, but mostly amateur) Shakespeare websites you may have found by now.

I will provide
additional academic resources for you in the Week 13 content. Please note that
skimming is often a useful strategy for reading academic sources and finding
the content you need.

Your Essay Should

  • Provide a summary of the play in 2
    to 4 sentences for a college-educated audience that may not know (or
    remember) the play.
  • Consider how much of the meaning of
    the play is in the play itself and how much is within ourselves as we are
    products of our own culture? This
    question is hard, but it is the crux of the essay, too.
  • Frame Othello in terms of historical periods. You
    will need at least one paragraph each on the realities of the different
    historical contexts and how they impact the play’s audience in each case.
  • Focus on the elements of the play
    that speak to you the most. Which do you want to read, think, and write
    about for the next few weeks?

o Race. Note that the concept of “whiteness” was invented
when Europeans wanted to take land and resources from people with darker skin.

o Gender. How do we feel about Desdemona and Emilia now? How
might they have been viewed differently during periods when women had very
different lives?

o Human Nature (especially the Nature of Evil). Do pure evil and
pure goodness exist in the world? What are humans like? During Shakespeare’s
time, human behavior might be explained more in terms of God and religion than
psychology and neuroscience.

o War (Military Culture). Does the meaning of the play
change when the setting (war over who controls trade routes in the
Mediterranean)

2

is placed to a
contemporary war with Americans (and British) in the

Middle East?
o Religion. What did Christianity and Islam mean to
Shakespeare’s

original
audience? How has it changed over time for different audiences? Given global
pressures today, how might religion affect our interpretation today?

o Anything else. You do not have to choose ONE of these
elements. However, if you tried to squeeze all five of these into one paper AND
discussed at least two historical periods for each element, you would end up
with a very scattered, unfocused, and ultimately shallow essay.

Other Ideas to Consider

  1. What
    does it mean that Shakespeare wrote this play BEFORE the Atlantic slave trade
    was established? How did the slave system impact our understanding of this
    play?
  2. Why
    would antebellum Southern American audiences love Othello? What would the lesson be for them?
  3. What
    does it mean when Othello is played by an
    actor in blackface as opposed to more recent productions with (gasp)
    dark-skinned (African- descended) men. We
    cannot call British Black men,“African-AMERICANS.”
  4. What
    do you think of the Olivier blackface performance and the plot of Double Life, in which Ronald Coleman goes mad after
    playing Othello?
  5. What
    do you think of Toni Morrison’s revision of the play, which is rooted in the
    idea that Desdemona was raised by an African woman? How would that change the
    play?
  6. How
    do the movies change the meaning? What about Lawrence Fishburne? What about the
    teen version, O?

 TAKEN FROM OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
SITE (INSTRUCTOR RAMSEY)

Principles of Proper Quotation Format (MLA format)

1. Keep
quotations as short as possible.
2. A quotation is best when incorporated into a sentence that also includes
your

own wording. If
a sentence begins with quotation marks and ends with quotation marks and
contains only words taken from a source, you have not introduced the quotation
properly. Never have such a “stand-alone” quotation.

3. A sentence
containing a quotation should end with the source (the first piece of
information on the Works Cited list for the source) and page number in
parentheses. Normally this parenthetical citation comes before the final period
but outside any quotation marks at the end of the sentence, but you can insert
it at any natural pause in the sentence.

4. There are
three styles of quotations distinguished by how the passage is incorporated
into your own wording:

A. In a “Tag Quotation,” an introductory phrase (usually
identifying the source of the quotation) is joined by a comma to a full,
sentence-long quotation.

–Example:
According to Grafton, “This need for forbiddenness also accounts for
Charity’s voyeuristic impulse to continue watching Harney” (357). [Why no name in parentheses? Because I introduced the source
before the quotation.]

–Example: Brown
argues, “This insistence seems strange, even forced” (Smith 113).

B. In an “Analytic Quotation,” a complete sentence of analysis
by the student is followed by a colon introducing a quotation that illustrates
support for the argument. (The quotation illustrates the student’s analysis.)

–Example: Life
in North Dormer is intolerably oppressive to Charity: “She
is stifled by its petty bourgeois conventions and longs for adventure”
(Singley 113).

–Example: Tom
finds himself wondering why he came:
“He
couldn’t identify a reason for his own behavior, and this troubled him” (Brown
385).

C. In a “Blend Quotation,” a short phrase or even just a
single key word is quoted and included in the student’s own sentence in such a
fluid way that only the

5

quotation marks
may reveal the material to be a quotation. THIS
IS THE BEST TYPE OF QUOTATION.

–Example: Their
“silent lies” prevent the relationship from ever fully recovering (Watson 22).

–Example: From
the outset of Edith Wharton’s Summer, Charity Royall
dramatizes the “American quest for freedom” (Singley 155).

Again, if a sentence begins with quotation marks and ends
with quotation marks and contains only words taken from a source, you have not
introduced the quotation properly. Never have such a “stand-alone”
quotation.

USING DIRECT QUOTATIONS

Work direct
quotations directly into the fabric of your sentences.

DON’T say:

Tools Smith uses
include professional vocabulary, expert testimony, and personal experience.
“Studies by the Kaufmann Group indicate a 78% increase in depression” (6).

AGAIN, THIS IS POOR USE OF A DIRECT QUOTATION, and it’s
completely unclear. Does it support your identification of professional
vocabulary? Expert testimony? Personal experience? Who knows?!

Instead, write something like this “analytic” quotation:

Smith uses
personal experience as a tool. He also uses expert testimony: “Studies by the
Kaufmann Group indicate a 78% increase in depression” (6).

Or, even better, this “blend” quotation:

Smith uses
professional vocabulary and personal experience as tools to convince his readers
and engage them. Other tools include expert testimony, as seen in his reference
to the study by the Kaufmann Group, which found a “78% increase in depression”
(6) associated with second-hand smoke.

The post how textual interpretation varies with different readers and different historical contexts. appeared first on theFreshEssays.

Place an order with us. Our skilled and experienced writers will deliver a custom paper which is not plagiarized within the deadline which you will specify.

Note; 6 Hours urgent orders deliver also available.

If you need more clarifications contact our support staff via the live chat for immediate response.
Use the order calculator below and get ordering with Wishessays.com now!

TRY OUR SERVICES TODAY.

The post how textual interpretation varies with different readers and different historical contexts. appeared first on Academic Essay Guru.

 

"Looking for a Similar Assignment? Get Expert Help at an Amazing Discount!"

Hi there! Click one of our representatives below and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Chat with us on WhatsApp